Tony Summers

October 5, 2012

Catalina Island Conservancy

Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, is highly invasive in much of the United States and Canada. The Catalina Habitat Improvement and Restoration Program (CHIRP) of the Catalina Island Conservancy has developed this recipe for baking with the tender stems and green seeds of fennel.

Killer Fennel/Fennel Killer Molasses Cookies

Step 1: Collect and candy fennel.
Tender fennel stems and green immature seeds can be candied and used with this recipe. Tender fennel stems can be collected from plants when they are in the “bolting” phase as long as stems snap easily when bent. Stems should be peeled and chopped finely. Stems have a much milder anise (licorice) flavor than seeds. Add approx 1/2 cup sugar to 2 cups chopped fennel stems in a sauce pan and add just enough water to cover mixture. Simmer sugar and water until the majority of the liquid has evaporated and mixture is thick enough to not drip from a spoon. If using fennel seeds, add the same ratio of sugar to seeds but use 1/4 as much of the candied fennel in the final cookie recipe.

Step 2: Prepare cookie dough – makes approx 5 dozen cookies

Ingredients
3/4 cup margarine, melted
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup molasses
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 cups candied fennel
1/2 tsp ground cloves

Directions
In a medium bowl, mix together the melted margarine, 1 cup sugar, and egg until smooth. Stir in the molasses. Combine the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and cloves; blend into the molasses mixture and candied fennel. Cover and chill dough for 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spread dough on smooth, floured surface and roll fairly thin with rolling pin.

Cookies should be approx 3 inches in diameter.

Bake for 8 to 10 minutes. Candied fennel burns easily so be sure to check cookies at 6 to 8 minutes and remove if they appear to be burning.

    Leave a Comment

    Land

    nopales con huevo

    Blue Plate Special: Prickly Pear

    Fall is here, and the “cactus fig” is in season. Time to plate-up another widespread invader.


      EAT ME!
      Screen Shot 2012-11-18 at 8.02.21 AM

      Blue Plate Special: Sow Thistle

      It’s spring and time to weed. Sow thistle is a delicious invader found throughout the continent.


        EAT ME!
        800px-ChenopodiumAlbum001

        Lamb’s Quarters

        Lamb’s quarters was a popular spring tonic in the South—an early season edible green—but its leaves are good throughout the summer.       Chenopodium album Native range: Described by Linnaeus in 1753, this European native has been transferred throughout much of the world. Because its spread was rarely recorded, C. album‘s native and invasive [...]


          EAT ME!
          fennel01-l

          Wild Fennel

            Foeniculum vulgare Native range: Mediterranean, from Turkey west to Spain and Morocco Invasive range: Much of North and South America, South Africa, and parts of Oceania and the British Isles. Check out the USDA Plants Database to see if it’s found near you. Habitat: Roadsides, pastures, along the edge of wild habitats. Rocky shores [...]


            EAT ME!
            GarlicMustard1

            Garlic Mustard

              Alliaria petiolata Native range: Europe, Asia, Northwest Africa Invasive range: Much of the Lower 48, Alaska, and Canada. (See map.) Habitat: Moist, shaded soil of floodplains, forests, roadsides, edges of woods, and forest openings. Often dominant in disturbed areas. Description: Biennial herb. First-year plant has a rosette of green leaves close to the ground. [...]


              EAT ME!

              Sea

              Pterois volitans

              Lionfish

              Some say it started in 1992 in Miami when Hurricane Andrew smashed an aquarium tank. Don’t blame the weather, others say; in the mid-nineties, disappointed yet softhearted hobbyists…


                EAT ME!
                chuka wakame

                Wakame

                  Undaria pinnatifida Native range: Japan Sea Invasive range: Southern California, San Francisco Bay, New Zealand, Australia, Europe, Argentina Habitat: Opportunistic seaweed, can be found on hard substrates including rocky reefs, pylons, buoys, boat hulls, and abalone and bivalve shells. Description: Golden brown seaweed, growing up to nine feet. Forms thick canopy. Reproductive sporophyll in [...]


                  EAT ME!
                  Hemigrapsus_sanguineus_big

                  Asian Shore Crab

                  The first sighting of the Asian shore crab in the United States was at Townsend Inlet, Cape May County, New Jersey, in 1988. Though the source is unknown . . .


                    EAT ME!
                    Periwinkles

                    Periwinkle

                    The common periwinkle, which first appeared in New England in the 1860s, is now found along the coast wherever there’s hard substrate–rocks, riprap, broken concrete, or docks–from Labrador to . . .


                      EAT ME!
                      Kleiner_Taschenkrebs_(Carcinus_maenas)

                      Green Crab

                      Since the green crab was first recorded off southern Massachusetts in 1817, it has been hard to ignore. A few minutes of rock-flipping in Maine can turn up dozens of them, brandishing their claws as they retreat…


                        EAT ME!

                        Fresh

                        rusty_crayfish-large

                        Crayfish

                          There are numerous invasive crayfish. We include details for the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and the rusty crayfish (Orenectes rusticus). The same recipes can be used for both species–and many other invasive crayfish. Red Swamp Crayfish Native range: Known as Louisiana crayfish, crawdad, and mudbug, Procambarus clarkii is native to the south central [...]


                          EAT ME!
                          Distinguishing _ Channa argus

                          Northern Snakehead

                          His sister was ailing, and the man in Maryland remembered that, back home in Hong Kong, there was a fish that was considered a delicacy and a restorative. He would make a fish soup…


                            EAT ME!
                            bullfrog

                            Bullfrog

                            “They live in a wide variety of habitats, colonize new ones readily, and eat everything that fits into their mouths,” says Dr. Peter Moyle of the Center for Watershed Sciences at UC-Davis…


                              EAT ME!
                              nutria-mugshot

                              Nutria

                              Nutria, also known as coypu and river rat, is native to temperate and subtropical South America. It has been introduced to Europe, Asia, and Africa, mainly for fur farming. These voracious. . .


                                EAT ME!
                                Picture 1

                                Common Carp

                                For a bottom-feeder, what is the good life? The common carp isn’t very demanding: any body of water that’s sluggish and murky will do. One catching sewage or…


                                  EAT ME!

                                  Field Notes

                                  crab_01

                                  Green Crabs Are Multiplying. Should We Eat the Enemy?

                                  How to turn the pleasing ocean flavor of green crabs into a profit for crabbers and a new way to control the invaders? Read more about cooking green crabs here.


                                    EAT ME!
                                    unnamed-2

                                    Pressure Builds for Swift U.S. Action Against Spreading Salamander Threat

                                    There are signs of hope for American salamanders in the face of a potential biological catastrophe — a fungus that could be carried here through the global trade in exotic pets. The tool for protecting native salamanders is the Lacey Act, which was recently used to limit trade in various constricting snakes and has been [...]


                                      EAT ME!
                                      Screenshot 2015-03-23 17.08.58

                                      Invasive Species Poster

                                      Free download here.


                                        EAT ME!
                                        images

                                        National Invasive Species Awareness Week

                                        February 22-28, 2015 Participate in events across the nation to raise awareness and identify solutions to invasive species issues at local, state, tribal, regional and national scales. Locate an invasive species event in your state or county. Read more about National Invasive Species Awareness Week here.


                                          EAT ME!
                                          water-hyacinth

                                          Striking a Deal with the Weed from Hell

                                          After eradicating the water hyacinth from Florida’s Crystal River, managers are slowly starting to bring the notorious aquatic weed back to the famed manatee winter ground. Read more in Conservation Magazine.


                                            EAT ME!

                                            “I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority.”

                                            E. B. White

                                            Previous post:

                                            Next post: