From the category archives:

News & Reviews

National Invasive Species Awareness Week

February 4, 2016

Save the date. National Invasive Species Awareness Week is coming up, February 21-27, 2016. See the map for an event near you.

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    Protect the environment: Eat these animals!

    December 2, 2015

    Keiron Monks reports on Eat the Invaders on CNN.

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      When Conservation Means Killing

      September 29, 2015

      Herbicides and insecticides are key tools in managing invasive species — but managers are working to find more environmentally friendly substitutes. Read more about it here. And remember that prevention is the best practice: “I try to get the message out to staff, scientists or anyone . . . to make sure they’re not tracking [...]

        Full article

        8 Invasive Species You Should Be Eating

        July 16, 2015

        If you can’t beat ’em, eat ‘em. Foragers turn to eating invasive species as a means of control. Lisa Munniksma reports on eating invasive species in hobbyfarms.com.

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          To Stop West Nile, Go Native

          July 15, 2015

          When contemplating the harm caused by invasive species, the imagination usually stops at fairly direct effects: an introduced predator decimates hapless prey; invasive weeds choke out native plants. But hacking around in the shrubbery a bit — literally — reveals that native and invasive species also have subtler pros and cons. Certain species of invasive [...]

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            Eat Your Way to a Better Ecosystem

            July 11, 2015

            Eat the Invaders on The List. Why eat invasive species? 1. They’re tasty. 2. You learn about the local environment. 3. Invasive populations decline. Our appetites can make a difference.

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              These Invasive Catfish Are Destroying the Chesapeake—and They’re Delicious

              June 22, 2015

              “Across the board, biodiversity is being affected,” says Sharon Feuer Gruber of the blue catfish invasion. The Wide Net Project aims to take on this invader in Chesapeake Bay. Read more at Yahoo Food.

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                Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition

                June 21, 2015

                “Education, mitigation, utilization.” Join the Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition to help educate the public and encourage the consumption of lionfish in restaurants and seafood markets. Read more about the coalition here.

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                  Appetite for Destruction

                  June 6, 2015

                  Night after night, the same scene plays out at Miya’s Sushi in New Haven, Connecticut. A few less-than-courageous patrons spend minutes gawking at the menu before turning around and walking right back out the door. Read more about putting invasives on the menu in Hemispheres Magazine.

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                    Green Crabs Are Multiplying. Should We Eat the Enemy?

                    May 28, 2015

                    How to turn the pleasing ocean flavor of green crabs into a profit for crabbers and a new way to control the invaders? Read more about cooking green crabs here.

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                      Land

                      nopales con huevo

                      Prickly Pear

                      Fall is here, and the “cactus fig” is in season. Time to plate-up another widespread invader.


                        EAT ME!
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                        Sow Thistle

                        It’s spring and time to weed. Sow thistle is a delicious invader found throughout the continent.


                          EAT ME!
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                          Lamb’s Quarters

                          Lamb’s quarters was a popular spring tonic in the South—an early season edible green—but its leaves are good throughout the summer.       Chenopodium album Native range: Described by Linnaeus in 1753, this European native has been transferred throughout much of the world. Because its spread was rarely recorded, C. album‘s native and invasive [...]


                            EAT ME!
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                            Garlic Mustard

                              Alliaria petiolata Native range: Europe, Asia, Northwest Africa Invasive range: Much of the Lower 48, Alaska, and Canada. (See map.) Habitat: Moist, shaded soil of floodplains, forests, roadsides, edges of woods, and forest openings. Often dominant in disturbed areas. Description: Biennial herb. First-year plant has a rosette of green leaves close to the ground. [...]


                              EAT ME!
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                              Wild Fennel

                                Foeniculum vulgare Native range: Mediterranean, from Turkey west to Spain and Morocco Invasive range: Much of North and South America, South Africa, and parts of Oceania and the British Isles. Check out the USDA Plants Database to see if it’s found near you. Habitat: Roadsides, pastures, along the edge of wild habitats. Rocky shores [...]


                                EAT ME!

                                Sea

                                Pterois volitans

                                Lionfish

                                Some say it started in 1992 in Miami when Hurricane Andrew smashed an aquarium tank. Don’t blame the weather, others say; in the mid-nineties, disappointed yet softhearted hobbyists…


                                  EAT ME!
                                  chuka wakame

                                  Wakame

                                    Undaria pinnatifida Native range: Japan Sea Invasive range: Southern California, San Francisco Bay, New Zealand, Australia, Europe, Argentina Habitat: Opportunistic seaweed, can be found on hard substrates including rocky reefs, pylons, buoys, boat hulls, and abalone and bivalve shells. Description: Golden brown seaweed, growing up to nine feet. Forms thick canopy. Reproductive sporophyll in [...]


                                    EAT ME!
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                                    Asian Shore Crab

                                    The first sighting of the Asian shore crab in the United States was at Townsend Inlet, Cape May County, New Jersey, in 1988. Though the source is unknown . . .


                                      EAT ME!
                                      Periwinkles

                                      Periwinkle

                                      The common periwinkle, which first appeared in New England in the 1860s, is now found along the coast wherever there’s hard substrate–rocks, riprap, broken concrete, or docks–from Labrador to . . .


                                        EAT ME!
                                        Kleiner_Taschenkrebs_(Carcinus_maenas)

                                        Green Crab

                                        Since the green crab was first recorded off southern Massachusetts in 1817, it has been hard to ignore. A few minutes of rock-flipping in Maine can turn up dozens of them, brandishing their claws as they retreat…


                                          EAT ME!

                                          Fresh

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                                          Blue Plate Special: Watercress

                                          Summer is here. Time for wild watercress tea sandwiches!     Nasturtium officianale Native Range: Northern Africa, Europe, temperate Asia, and India Invasive Range: In USA: all lower 48 states, except North Dakota. Found in Alaska, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Also southern Canada, Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, Australasia, and parts of tropical Asia. [...]


                                            EAT ME!
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                                            Crayfish

                                              There are numerous invasive crayfish. We include details for the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and the rusty crayfish (Orenectes rusticus). The same recipes can be used for both species–and many other invasive crayfish. Red Swamp Crayfish Native range: Known as Louisiana crayfish, crawdad, and mudbug, Procambarus clarkii is native to the south central [...]


                                              EAT ME!
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                                              Northern Snakehead

                                              His sister was ailing, and the man in Maryland remembered that, back home in Hong Kong, there was a fish that was considered a delicacy and a restorative. He would make a fish soup…


                                                EAT ME!
                                                bullfrog

                                                Bullfrog

                                                “They live in a wide variety of habitats, colonize new ones readily, and eat everything that fits into their mouths,” says Dr. Peter Moyle of the Center for Watershed Sciences at UC-Davis…


                                                  EAT ME!
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                                                  Nutria

                                                  Nutria, also known as coypu and river rat, is native to temperate and subtropical South America. It has been introduced to Europe, Asia, and Africa, mainly for fur farming. These voracious. . .


                                                    EAT ME!

                                                    Field Notes

                                                    NISAW-logo09

                                                    National Invasive Species Awareness Week

                                                    Save the date. National Invasive Species Awareness Week is coming up, February 21-27, 2016. See the map for an event near you.


                                                      EAT ME!
                                                      151118171034-spear-fishing-in-florida-medium-plus-169

                                                      Protect the environment: Eat these animals!

                                                      Keiron Monks reports on Eat the Invaders on CNN.


                                                        EAT ME!
                                                        article_pesticides_in_conservation_main-760x378

                                                        When Conservation Means Killing

                                                        Herbicides and insecticides are key tools in managing invasive species — but managers are working to find more environmentally friendly substitutes. Read more about it here. And remember that prevention is the best practice: “I try to get the message out to staff, scientists or anyone . . . to make sure they’re not tracking [...]


                                                          EAT ME!
                                                          invasive-species8_800

                                                          8 Invasive Species You Should Be Eating

                                                          If you can’t beat ’em, eat ‘em. Foragers turn to eating invasive species as a means of control. Lisa Munniksma reports on eating invasive species in hobbyfarms.com.


                                                            EAT ME!
                                                            Blackberry-640x450

                                                            To Stop West Nile, Go Native

                                                            When contemplating the harm caused by invasive species, the imagination usually stops at fairly direct effects: an introduced predator decimates hapless prey; invasive weeds choke out native plants. But hacking around in the shrubbery a bit — literally — reveals that native and invasive species also have subtler pros and cons. Certain species of invasive [...]


                                                              EAT ME!

                                                              “What is being lost? The answer is easy. A precious and irreplaceable part of Florida’s, and the nation’s, heritage is disappearing. Plants, animals, and entire ecosystems that took tens of thousands to millions of years to evolve are at risk. What is being gained in their place? A hodgepodge of species found in other parts of the world. . . . Florida is being homogenized, and everyone, for all time to come, will be the poorer for it.”

                                                              —E. O. Wilson, in his foreword to Strangers in Paradise: Impact and Management of Nonindigenous Species in Florida