Catching, selling monkeys in FL is lucrative and controversial

January 6, 2012

What to do with an invasive monkey? Sell it for medical research? Scott Chelsak has been capturing invasive Rhesus monkeys for 14 years.
 

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Gainesville Sun: Catching, selling Silver River monkeys is lucrative

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    Blue Plate Special: Sow Thistle

    It’s spring and time to weed. Sow thistle is a delicious invader found throughout the continent.


      EAT ME!
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      Lamb’s Quarters

      Lamb’s quarters was a popular spring tonic in the South—an early season edible green—but its leaves are good throughout the summer.       Chenopodium album Native range: Described by Linnaeus in 1753, this European native has been transferred throughout much of the world. Because its spread was rarely recorded, C. album‘s native and invasive [...]


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        Wild Fennel

          Foeniculum vulgare Native range: Mediterranean, from Turkey west to Spain and Morocco Invasive range: Much of North and South America, South Africa, and parts of Oceania and the British Isles. Check out the USDA Plants Database to see if it’s found near you. Habitat: Roadsides, pastures, along the edge of wild habitats. Rocky shores [...]


          EAT ME!
          GarlicMustard1

          Garlic Mustard

            Alliaria petiolata Native range: Europe, Asia, Northwest Africa Invasive range: Much of the Lower 48, Alaska, and Canada. (See map.) Habitat: Moist, shaded soil of floodplains, forests, roadsides, edges of woods, and forest openings. Often dominant in disturbed areas. Description: Biennial herb. First-year plant has a rosette of green leaves close to the ground. [...]


            EAT ME!
            Wild_boar

            Wild Boar

            Did the domestic ancestors of today’s feral pigs streak off De Soto’s ship into the Florida scrub of their own accord in 1539? Or did they have to be urged to go find something to eat? All you need to…


              EAT ME!

              Sea

              Pterois volitans

              Lionfish

              Some say it started in 1992 in Miami when Hurricane Andrew smashed an aquarium tank. Don’t blame the weather, others say; in the mid-nineties, disappointed yet softhearted hobbyists…


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                chuka wakame

                Wakame

                  Undaria pinnatifida Native range: Japan Sea Invasive range: Southern California, San Francisco Bay, New Zealand, Australia, Europe, Argentina Habitat: Opportunistic seaweed, can be found on hard substrates including rocky reefs, pylons, buoys, boat hulls, and abalone and bivalve shells. Description: Golden brown seaweed, growing up to nine feet. Forms thick canopy. Reproductive sporophyll in [...]


                  EAT ME!
                  Hemigrapsus_sanguineus_big

                  Asian Shore Crab

                  The first sighting of the Asian shore crab in the United States was at Townsend Inlet, Cape May County, New Jersey, in 1988. Though the source is unknown . . .


                    EAT ME!
                    Periwinkles

                    Periwinkle

                    The common periwinkle, which first appeared in New England in the 1860s, is now found along the coast wherever there’s hard substrate–rocks, riprap, broken concrete, or docks–from Labrador to . . .


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                      Kleiner_Taschenkrebs_(Carcinus_maenas)

                      Green Crab

                      Since the green crab was first recorded off southern Massachusetts in 1817, it has been hard to ignore. A few minutes of rock-flipping in Maine can turn up dozens of them, brandishing their claws as they retreat…


                        EAT ME!

                        Fresh

                        Procambarus_clarkii_tank

                        Red Swamp Crayfish

                          Procambarus clarkii Native range: Red Swamp Crayfish, also known as Louisiana Crayfish, Crawdad, and Mudbug, is native to the south central United States and northeastern Mexico. Invasive range: Widely introduced throughout the United States including Arizona, California, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Nevada, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia. Populations have [...]


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                          Distinguishing _ Channa argus

                          Northern Snakehead

                          His sister was ailing, and the man in Maryland remembered that, back home in Hong Kong, there was a fish that was considered a delicacy and a restorative. He would make a fish soup…


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                            bullfrog

                            Bullfrog

                            “They live in a wide variety of habitats, colonize new ones readily, and eat everything that fits into their mouths,” says Dr. Peter Moyle of the Center for Watershed Sciences at UC-Davis…


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                              Nutria

                              Nutria, also known as coypu and river rat, is native to temperate and subtropical South America. It has been introduced to Europe, Asia, and Africa, mainly for fur farming. These voracious. . .


                                EAT ME!
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                                Common Carp

                                For a bottom-feeder, what is the good life? The common carp isn’t very demanding: any body of water that’s sluggish and murky will do. One catching sewage or…


                                  EAT ME!

                                  Field Notes

                                  lionfish-690

                                  An App to Find Nemo

                                  “Creating a consumer market for invasive species is one of the most successful ways of combatting them. Like cupcakes or artisanal pickles, it can take a lot of marketing and hype to create a demand that matches the supply. The Connecticut chef Bun Lai’s invasive-species menu, which Elizabeth Kolbert wrote about in 2012, includes lionfish [...]


                                    EAT ME!
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                                    Hunting for Alien Bug and Seed Invaders at Baltimore’s Port

                                    The fight against invaders starts at seaports and airports across the world. Listen to the NPR story here.


                                      EAT ME!
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                                      Attack of the Green Crabs

                                      Green crabs on the move in Maine and the Maritimes. Watch the movie here.


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                                        Clean Boats, Clean Tournaments

                                        Help stop the spread of invasive species.


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                                          Invasive Control, Bite by Bite

                                          Dorothy Pellett discusses eating invaders in the Burlington Free Press. Read the story here.


                                            EAT ME!

                                            “We are showing others how to harvest in nature, because the things you find there taste better. . . . Try one of those blueberries, then a stupid one grown in a greenhouse. Your reference point for what a blueberry tastes like has changed forever.”

                                            René Redzepi, owner of Copenhagen’s Noma, twice named best restaurant in the world

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