From the category archives:

Field Notes

Clean Boats, Clean Tournaments

May 16, 2014

Help stop the spread of invasive species.

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    Invasive Control, Bite by Bite

    May 12, 2014

    Dorothy Pellett discusses eating invaders in the Burlington Free Press. Read the story here.

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      Extraterrestrial Invaders

      May 8, 2014

      Three new scientific papers examine the risk of organisms native to Earth hitching a ride to another planet. Read more here.

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        Snakeheads on the Potomac

        April 26, 2014

        April in DC. It means cherry blossoms for many and the start of northern snakehead season for a few. Fly fisherman and archer Austin Murphy recounts his efforts to catch the snakehead in the nation’s capital river. Northern snakeheads were first discovered in the Potomac River in 2004. I saw my first snakehead swimming in [...]

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          Invasive Cuisine

          April 2, 2014

          Joe Roman talks with Jane Lindholm of Vermont Public Radio about his mission to change what’s on our dinner plates. Listen here.

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            What’s the Deal with . . . Invasivorism

            April 2, 2014

            “Invasivorism.” Practice saying it, because you’re gonna be hearing it a lot at cocktail parties and spying it on menus. Feral hog sashimi, grilled snakehead tacos, and Asian carp cakes, anyone? Yahoo! Food features editor Alex Van Buren speaks to Joe Roman about eating invasive species here.

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              The Gourmet Invasivore’s Dilemma

              March 30, 2014

              “The invasivore movement has caught fire. Some of the worst invaders, like gypsy moths and Asian long-horned beetles, will not grace lunch counters anytime soon, yet where perniciousness meets deliciousness, there is hope.” Rowan Jacobsen writes about Bun Lai and Joe Roman in April’s Outside Magazine.

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                New Green Crab Fishery in Canada

                March 23, 2014

                Fisheries and Oceans Canada wants to create a commercial green crab fishery on Prince Edward Island. Read more about it here.

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                  Invader vs. Invader

                  February 17, 2014

                  Crazy ants may soon displace fire ants from much of the southeastern U.S. and become the new ecologically dominant invasive ant species. Read more here.

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                    Eat the Invaders in Brazil

                    February 9, 2014

                    Fala portugués? Eat the Invaders has been covered by Brazil’s Época magazine. Roast capybara, anyone? Coma as Invasores

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                      Land

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                      Wild Pig

                      Did the domestic ancestors of today’s feral pigs streak off De Soto’s ship into the Florida scrub of their own accord in 1539? Or did they have to be urged to go find something to eat? All you need to…


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                        Garden Snail

                        Deliberately or accidentally, by the movement of plants and by hobbyists who collect snails, humans have spread the garden snail to temperate and subtropical zones around the world.


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                          Prickly Pear

                          Fall is here, and the “cactus fig” is in season. Time to plate-up another widespread invader.


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                            Sow Thistle

                            It’s spring and time to weed. Sow thistle is a delicious invader found throughout the continent.


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                              Lamb’s Quarters

                              Lamb’s quarters was a popular spring tonic in the South—an early season edible green—but its leaves are good throughout the summer.       Chenopodium album Native range: Described by Linnaeus in 1753, this European native has been transferred throughout much of the world. Because its spread was rarely recorded, C. album‘s native and invasive [...]


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                                Sea

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                                Asian Shore Crab

                                The first sighting of the Asian shore crab in the United States was at Townsend Inlet, Cape May County, New Jersey, in 1988. Though the source is unknown . . .


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                                  Periwinkles

                                  Periwinkle

                                  The common periwinkle, which first appeared in New England in the 1860s, is now found along the coast wherever there’s hard substrate–rocks, riprap, broken concrete, or docks–from Labrador to . . .


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                                    Lionfish

                                    Some say it started in 1992 in Miami when Hurricane Andrew smashed an aquarium tank. Don’t blame the weather, others say; in the mid-nineties, disappointed yet softhearted hobbyists…


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                                      Wakame

                                        Undaria pinnatifida Native range: Japan Sea Invasive range: Southern California, San Francisco Bay, New Zealand, Australia, Europe, Argentina Habitat: Opportunistic seaweed, can be found on hard substrates including rocky reefs, pylons, buoys, boat hulls, and abalone and bivalve shells. Description: Golden brown seaweed, growing up to nine feet. Forms thick canopy. Reproductive sporophyll in [...]


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                                        Green Crab

                                        Since the green crab was first recorded off southern Massachusetts in 1817, it has been hard to ignore. A few minutes of rock-flipping in Maine can turn up dozens of them, brandishing their claws as they retreat…


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                                          Fresh

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                                          Armored Catfish

                                          The armored catfish is abundant and destructive in Florida, Texas, and Mexico. Cast your nets for these flavorful natives of the Amazon. Scientific name: Two types have become established in North America: armadillo del rio, Hypostomus plecostomus, and sailfin catfishes in genus Pterygoplichthys Native range: Amazon River Basin Invasive range: Texas, Florida, and Hawaii; also [...]


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                                            Common Carp

                                            For a bottom-feeder, what is the good life? The common carp isn’t very demanding: any body of water that’s sluggish and murky will do. If the water is clean, and you’ve got corn for bait, try one of these recipes.


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                                              Watercress

                                                Nasturtium officianale Native Range: Northern Africa, Europe, temperate Asia, and India Invasive Range: In USA: all lower 48 states, except North Dakota. Found in Alaska, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Also southern Canada, Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, Australasia, and parts of tropical Asia. Habitat: Common along stream margins, ditches, and other areas with [...]


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                                                Crayfish

                                                  There are numerous invasive crayfish. We include details for the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and the rusty crayfish (Orenectes rusticus). The same recipes can be used for both species–and many other invasive crayfish. Red Swamp Crayfish Native range: Known as Louisiana crayfish, crawdad, and mudbug, Procambarus clarkii is native to the south central [...]


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                                                  Nutria

                                                  Nutria, also known as coypu and river rat, is native to temperate and subtropical South America. It has been introduced to Europe, Asia, and Africa, mainly for fur farming. These voracious. . .


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                                                    Field Notes

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                                                    The Alien Aesthetic

                                                    Patterson Clark turns invasive plants into art. As a volunteer for the National Park Service, he got an idea: “One day, when I was pulling a plant, I thought, how can I change my relationship with this plant so that it’s not just eradication, taking something’s life? Since then, I’ve been harvesting invasive plants, rather [...]


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                                                      The Lionfish Market

                                                      In a sign that the eat-the-invaders movement continues to gain steam, the University of West Florida’s College of Business is offering a course on marketing the highly invasive lionfish to consumers. Read more about it here.


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                                                        New Species Invade Campus Dining

                                                        Inspired by the work of the Eat the Invaders project, UVM Dining and the University of Vermont Real Food Working Group hosted a dinner featuring edible invasive species.


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                                                          Invasive Herbs for Herbal Tea

                                                          The ingredients for many herbal teas, including lemon balm, mint, and nettles, have become naturalized in the United States. RateTea reviews a few of them here.


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                                                            Can Markets Handle Invasive Species?

                                                            Marketing campaigns are underway to spur demand for the flaky white fillets of lionfish. The Reef Environmental Education Foundation has published a cookbook in an attempt to get people to realize that lionfish is an option for dinner. Whole Foods has hosted “Take a Bite Out of Lionfish”: live filleting and cooking demos and lionfish [...]


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                                                              You have to be clear about [eating invasives]. Extinction is a happy ending.

                                                              Bill Walton, Auburn University, in Audubon, 2004